FACULTY PANEL - 'Kaleidoscope Histories'
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Professor Naomi Tadmor

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Dr Fiona Edmonds
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Professor Julia Gillen
 

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Dr James Taylor
 

This year's Faculty Panel will discuss 'Kaleidoscope Histories: Subtle and Contradictory Transitions in Historical Research.'

Panellists will guide us through how they have dealt with subtle and contradictory transitions in their own historical research before fielding your questions about overcoming difficult transitions in your own research, be they methodological or historiographical.

Each panellist will present for up to 10 minutes each before the Q&A begins, selected questions are at the discretion of the panel chair.

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Professor Naomi Tadmor

Professor of History | Lancaster University

Naomi Tadmor is Professor of History at Lancaster University. She specialises in early modern British history and has published extensively on the history and kinship, family, and community ties, on religious culture, and on the history of welfare. Her new book The settlement of the poor in England c. 1660-1780: law, society, and state formation is in press, to be published by Cambridge University Press. She has taught at researched at the universities of Lancaster, Sussex, Cambridge, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and has held Fellowships in the UK, USA, and Israel.

Dr Fiona Edmonds

Reader in Regional History | Lancaster University

Fiona Edmonds is a historian of medieval Britain and Ireland, with interests ranging from the sixth century to the twelfth. Her research focuses on maritime connections and now-lost kingdoms. Her particular areas of interest are the Irish Sea region in the Viking Age, and central Britain (northern England and southern Scotland) prior to the Anglo-Scottish border. Her monograph investigates links between the kingdom of Northumbria and the Gaelic-speaking world, and she has also worked on connections between Northumbria, Strathclyde and Wales. She has been involved in funded projects on Furness Abbey’s links across the Irish Sea and contacts between Britain and Brittany. She is interested in interdisciplinary work, for example combining historical and linguistic evidence through the study of names. She is the Director of the Regional Heritage Centre.

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Professor Julia Gillen

Professor of Literacy Studies| Lancaster University

Julia Gillen is Director of the Edwardian Postcard Project.  Her collection of 3000 postcards recently joined the Lancaster Digital Collections and she is writing a monograph: The Edwardian Picture Postcard as a Communications Revolution: A Literacy Studies Perspective (Routledge). Julia is Professor of Literacy Studies in the Department of Linguistics and English Literacy and a former Director of the Lancaster Literacy Research Centre. Currently she is Associate Dean for Engagement in FASS.

Julia researches diverse topics in Literacy Studies.  Currently she is co-investigator in two ESRC projects: 0-3 children’s language and literacy learning at home in a digital age and Research mobilities in primary literacy education. Her publications include Digital Literacies (2014, Routledge).

Dr James Taylor

Senior Lecturer | Lancaster University

James Taylor is a historian of modern Britain whose work occupies the intersections between economic, social, and cultural history. He has published on a diverse range of subjects, from the early history of corporate governance and the regulation of commercial fraud, to the origins of financial journalism and the development of modern advertising. His research has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the British Academy, and the Economic History Society, and his monographs have won prizes in economic and business history. His latest co-authored monograph, Invested: How Three Centuries of Stock Market Advice Reshaped Our Money, Markets, and Minds, is published by the University of Chicago Press in November 2022.

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